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20110301
20110331
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 142 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besides japan'
>> susie: from unrest in libya to uncertainty in japan, how the unknown is coloring the outlook for oil prices. >> tom: and we get the latest from japan, one week after its deadly earthquake and tsunami. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 18. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. president obama put libya on notice today saying the u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and w
>> susie: investors face fear and confusion as japan's nuclear crisis continues. energy regulators around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of t
underway in new york. >> susie: so, were the tips illegal, or just good research? it's a question at the heart of wall street's $2 trillion hedge fund industry. you're watching "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 8. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. jury selection began today in the biggest insider trading case in a decade. on trial is raj rajaratnam, the billionaire investor and cofounder of the galleon hedge fund. tom, he's accused of making $45 million through illegal stock tips. >> tom: susie, prosecutors allege rajaratnam and 25 others swapped confidential corporate secrets on many well known companies, including google, ibm, ebay, intel, and goldman sachs. >> susie: our cameras were rolling when rajaratnam pulled up to the courthouse early this morning. from the moment he arrived, raj rajaratnam was in the spotlight. >> are y
>> susie: the world watches japan as questions mount about the human tragedy and the potential damage to the global economic recovery. >> the global recovery will not be derailed by the events in japan, given everything we know today. >> susie: from the auto industry in japan to the future of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention aroun
>> susie: japan's unfolding nuclear crisis derails markets around the globe. the dow tumbled almost 300 points at the open. >> the global markets were very anxious. it was an absolute... i wouldn't call it a flight to safety; it was a flight to cash. it looked like people were desperate for liquidity. >> susie: market strategist mike holland and economist diane swonk weigh in with their analysis. you're watching "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 15. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off. japan is on high alert tonight as the country responds to yet another explosion at the daichi nuclear power plant. japan's prime minister warned of substantial radiation leaks. the ongoing threat of radioactive fallout led to a global market sell-off today. we have complete coverage, beginning in tokyo with correspondent
captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: wall street's bull run celebrates its second anniversary with flat trading in stocks. but there's big action in bonds, as the king of bonds sells all his holding in u.s. treasuries. >> tom: we ask pimco's bill gross why he's bailing out of government debt and where he's putting money now. you're watching "nightly business" report for wednesday, march 9. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the world's largest bond fund is betting against bonds. pimco's total return fund has sold off its government bond holdings to zero as of the end of february. tom, this is a strong signal from pimco's flagship fund that it sees little value in owning u.s. treasuries. >> tom: susie, as a result of those bond sales, pimco is sitting on $54 billion of cash. the fund still owns other kinds of bonds. it's holdings are diversified among mortgage bonds,
to pick them up a little cheaper. >> susie: we talk challenges and opportunities in stocks with a market bull and a market bear. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, march 10. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening. investors haven't seen a sell- off in stocks like today's since last summer. several worries were pressuring the markets today, violence in saudi arabia and renewed concerns about europe among them, susie. >> susie: tom, adding to the jitters-- worries about china's economic growth, and some disappointing news about the u.s. job market. the selling was broad-based-- the dow fell 228 points, closing below the 12,000 level; the nasdaq lost 50, and the s&p 500 was down almost 25 points. >> tom: this stock selling comes as the bull market celebrated its second anniversary this week. could the rally be over, or just taking a pause? peter c
. >> susie: still almost 200,000 americans got jobs last month and the unemployment rate fell below 9% for the first time in almost two years. >> tom: can the hiring continue? the outlook for the u.s. job market from two top economists. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 4. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. finally we got some good news today about the job market: strong business hiring in february. but tom, that was overshadowed by a big jump in oil prices. >> tom: susie, oil prices surged again today as anti-government protests continued in libya, bahrain and yemen. april crude futures now stand at $104 a barrel up $2.50 to more than a two-year high. but on the bright side, american businesses added 192,000 jobs in february-- the fastest pace of hiring since last may. the unemployment rate dropped to 8.9%-- the third
>> susie: new-home sales land in the basement, tumbling almost 17% to their lowest level on record. still, some buyers are hoping for spring. >> we're hoping that people who have been holding out on putting their homes on the market will be doing so now. >> tom: a glut of foreclosures means even lower prices for sellers, but more homes to choose from for buyers. you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 23. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. new signs today the u.s. housing market still is struggling. susie, that's even as many parts of the economy are recovering. >> susie: tom, what got everyone concerned is the latest new home sales numbers. they fell to a record low. sales tumbled almost 17% in february. even lower prices couldn't bring in the buyers. the average selling price for a new home fell to $202,000. at the
>> susie: japan in crisis. a massive earthquake rocks the asian nation. that unleashed a powerful tsunami pushing rivers of water through coastal cities and farmland. >> tom: with damages likely in the billions of dollars, we look at whether the crisis will derail japan's economic recovery and the global comeback. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 11. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everyone. a state of emergency in japan tonight. officials are still trying to assess the scope of the damage and casualties from that massive earthquake. susie, the magnitude of the quake 8.9 is the strongest on record in japan. >> susie: tom, it's still not clear what the devastating earthquake will do to japan's fragile economy and the global markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minut
this. >> susie: and with that, steve jobs was back. the apple c.e.o. takes a break from medical leave to unveil the ipad 2. >> tom: it's twice as fast as its predecessor and expected to lead the year of the tablet computer. you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 2. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, and thanks for joining us. saying he wouldn't want to miss it, apple c.e.o. steve jobs was on stage in san francisco today, susie, where he introduced the new ipad 2. >> susie: tom, seeing jobs was a huge surprise, and he got a standing ovation. and then here on wall street, investors applauded the news; apple shares jumped nearly 2% in intra-day trading. apple fans and investors were happy to see a thin but energetic steve jobs. it was the c.e.o.'s first public appearance since taking medical leave in january. he called the ipad 2 "magical," saying the tablet is a t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 142 (some duplicates have been removed)